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views on the global economy and perhaps you could start with europe and make your way around the world and perspective on what you see in terms of growth and perhaps more importantly you know, what are the challenges that we are going to have to deal with over the next period of time? >> there's not enough time for all the challenges but let me give you some perspective. let me get to -- let me give away the punchline. the punchline is i think in a world races, the world is not going to come to coming to an end. we are going to muddle through but there are a lot of challenges and a lot of risks that i think the largest outcome come the largest for signage likely outcome by far is that we get through it and a lot of action were to be taken to offer some relief but there are several things that could cause things to derail in which case it would be a lot tougher for a lot longer. but you asked about europe. i think the biggest problem that europe has is growth and the risk problem is the go off the rail, bus stop of the euro. a few months ago we would have said that the two big issues fo
in discretionary spending cuts drives the economy back in recession and cost 2 million jobs. on the other hand, it also goes a long way in reducing the budget deficit. even by washington standards, that all seems important. to discuss the cliff and the consequences, we have a panel of four budget watchers. bob greenstein is head of the president obama's transition policy work. doug holz-eakin, president of the action forum, headed the staff, directer of the congressional budget office. he was a member of the president bush's economic adviser and was an acting directer of cbo. finally, diane lim rogers blog z as economist mom and was chief economist for the house committee and the ways and means committee. our format today will be relatively straightforward. each speaks for five minutes, and i'll ask questions, we'll l get a discussion going here and turn it over to the audience to give you a chance to ask the questions. we've people watching on c-span and the web, and if you're not in the room, send them to publicaffairs@urban.org, and those questions will come to me. to start, donald? >> than
of return. do something to get the economy to move again. i think there's a lot of compelling unions that are think abouting it circhtly. to underestimate the kind of [inaudible] >> i would say one thing to watch political any in the jersey we come from a unionized state than a lot of states in the south. the union have different power and i think one of the things that is important to watch you saw it in wisconsin and you see in other places it's a growing system between public sector and union work force which is growing and the trade and the private sector. they are different views on politics and very different views on public policy coming from both sides. i think we're at an early stage on that. i think it is something to watch as we go forward in terms of the political objectives of public sector and private sector which ultimately different subjective you will see a bit of divergence in that. >> people love to talk about it. the division between public and private sector unions. there a certain number of tenet whether you're public or private. [inaudible] what you pay for the
even lose our country. >> ross perot, interviewed by "usa today"'s richard wol on the economy, the deficit and debt and how it's changed since he ran for president in 1992 and '96. find richard wolffe's article in today's edition of "usa today" and at usa today.com. raz perot tonight -- ross perot tonight on c-span at 9 eastern. >>> next, a look at the presidential campaign with libertarian party candidate gary johnson. the former republican governor of new mexico talks about his view of the two-party system and obstacles for third-party candidates. from "washington journal," this is 40 minutes. >> host: joining us now is gary johnson, the former governor of new mexico, a republican 1995-2003 who is now the libertarian presidential nominee, and gary johnson, first question. when you look at the major party candidates and this year's cycle, what's missing in the debate and the dialogue? and what do you wring to the table -- what do you bring to the table? >> guest: well, how about truth for starters. the notion that both obama and romney are arguing over who's going to spend mo
: weaver pretaped question on the economy that comes from wbgo-fm's director, doug doyle. let's listen to it. >> while so many people in suburban towns hour to get too much of the federal and state funding, what initiatives would you put in place to make sure that jobs are created in the inner cities, like trenton, newark and jersey city? >> moderator: senator menendez, europe first. menendez: i'm proud of the areas we work in our state. the reality is that transit villages, the new transportation bill. i'm glad to see that with my leadership on mass transit, new jersey will receive, an additional $70 million more. that legislation is looking at saving and/or creating about 52,000 jobs. a lot of those transit villages and opportunities are right in urban areas, using advantage of our infrastructure. livable communities. my legislation in that regard but hope communities that are not only urban, but the more suburban, but nonetheless very close to urban areas would create greater development opportunity as well. and so, we are going to continue to work with these communities so that in
the economy takes all the oxygen out of the election was a little bit of foreign affairs committee supreme court doesn't play among independent, undecided voters. it's a motivator for one space to get out and get to the polls because you want this person to replace justice ginsburg when she retires, for example. health care is the only thing that resonates. i don't know of any practical, it would be the point that the obama administration defends the defense of marriage act and president romney will defend the constitutionality, but it doesn't seem that social conservative question has a lot of allotted salience in some unlike a presidential debate. so i think other than health care i see much happening. >> i think it will not happen. and here is why. no major national political figure has attacked affirmative action publicly since 1996 or before. it is kind of remarkable. the republicans during the 90s for a while were seen some political profit in attacking affirmative action given the polls. don't do it anymore and the democrats, john kerry and the early 90s, joe lieberman in the early
done over the last three and a half years is to our economy and to our international stature and that has been done by this president. and actually, chris, i personally have complimented president obama many times and i'll be listened to my radio show now i share to do a fair amount. look, president obama might not know a lot about economics, but he does a mean karaoke. siliceous celebrate that. let's all hold hearings. mus back so in love with you. ♪ ishat all? come on. imagine mitt romney doing that. ♪ i'm so in love with you. >> i'm sorry, you've got to give it to both sides. our second obamagasm award. there's a priester, i can go to confession. goes to someone who celebrated a movement, not just an individual. this was on october 11, abcs, and i'm going to do her voice, diane sawyer of the perpetually heavy breathing voice, who's trying with a very blurry lines. last night i actually liked diane. i'm sorry, i feel guilty doing this, was trying vallely to describe the emergence of a movement known as the benevolent occupy wall street. >> without food for you up-to-dat
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7